So, you wanted body cams?

Discussion in 'In The News' started by John, Aug 11, 2017 at 9:48 AM.

  1. John

    John Well-Known Member

    Watch this next time you MMQ what a police officer shoulda coulda woulda.

     
  2. Andy

    Andy Wheelie for Safety

    Location:
    Los Altos, CA
    Name:
    Andy
    Published on Aug 10, 2017
    HAMPTON, SC (Aug. 9, 2017) – A Hampton County man who shot an Estill police officer on New Year’s Day in 2016 was sentenced Wednesday to 35 years in prison.

    A jury found Malcolm Antwan Orr, 29, of Grayson Street, guilty of attempted murder and possession of a weapon during the commission of a violent crime following a two-day trial at the Hampton County Courthouse. Orr was sentenced to the maximum amount of time: 30 years for the attempted murder offense and five years for the weapons violation. The sentences are to be served consecutively.

    Estill Police Officer Quincy Smith was shot four times Jan. 1, 2016, while responding to a call. A camera in Smith’s glasses, which the officer purchased for himself on Amazon, captured the incident.

    Smith's voice can be heard in the recording as he lay outside his patrol car, He told the emergency dispatcher, “Tell my family that I love them.”
    “If but not for the grace of God and some very good doctors, this would not only have been a murder case, but a death penalty case,” said 14th Circuit Solicitor Duffie Stone, who prosecuted the case.

    At about 11 a.m., Smith responded to a suspicious persons call at the Charles Party Shop along U.S. 321. A clerk told Smith that a man wearing camouflage and a red bandana tried snatching groceries from customers. Smith spotted a man matching that description walking away from the store along Railroad Avenue. Smith drove his patrol car a short distance toward the man, who was later identified as Orr. Smith parked and ordered Orr to stop. Orr refused and continued to walk away from Smith, holding a cellphone to his ear and keeping his right hand in his jacket pocket. Smith told him to take his hand out or he would “be tasered”. That’s when Orr brandished a 9 mm handgun and began firing, never taking the phone away from his ear.

    Smith was fired upon, “not once, not twice, not three times, or four, or five, or six, or seven, but eight times,” said Stone said during closing arguments. Stone placed each of the spent 9 mm casing on the railing at the jury box. Smith was struck at least three times, suffering two broken arm bones and a “life threatening” neck injury. At least two of the eight rounds were fired while Smith was lying on the ground and another two were fired as Smith ran for cover, back to his parked patrol car.

    Dr. James Dunne, the emergency room physician who treated Smith at Memorial Health Medical Center in Savannah, testified that a bullet completely severed a vein in the right side of Smith’s neck. A bullet also passed through Smith’s upper torso and was extracted from his back.

    The jury deliberated for less than 45 minutes before coming back with a guilty verdict.
     
  3. arnaud

    arnaud Legal Alien

    Location:
    Kelseyville
    Name:
    Arnaud
    Well this makes an excellent case for body cams, allowing for excellent evidence to help convict the defendants.
     
    Xler8 and Tim like this.
  4. Alanrider7

    Alanrider7 Sportbike Whisperer

    Location:
    The Track
    Again with the scumbag's face plastered all over. :rolleyes

    Why not show the officer??? The media is mentally ill.
     
    David13 and Tim like this.
  5. Andrew

    Andrew ... and Mexico will pay for it.

    Location:
    San Jose
    Name:
    Andrew
    Yep, we want body cams.

    What's your point?
     
  6. AndyH

    AndyH Δεν προσαρμοσμένο τίτλο χρήστη

    Location:
    Here
    Pity the cop didn't have his firearm drawn instead of the taser.
     
    afmoto and Tim like this.
  7. Classick

    Classick Off Topic King

    Location:
    Redwood City
    Name:
    Dave
    THIS is the point!!!

    these should have been department issued!
     
    Xler8 and Tim like this.
  8. Andrew

    Andrew ... and Mexico will pay for it.

    Location:
    San Jose
    Name:
    Andrew
    Holy ****! I didn't see that part.

    Sack that moronic police chief, stat!
     
  9. gwade

    gwade Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San Mateo
    Name:
    Garrett
    First thing that struck me...damn, took a long time for back up and an ambulance to arrive.
     
  10. JeffKoch

    JeffKoch Well-Known Member

    This one could've turned out far worse, the cop was very lucky to survive and the bad guy was caught and sent to prison for a very long time.

    But I wonder, what might the cop have done differently to avoid getting shot? My first thought watching the video was, this guy is crazy and/or he really does have a gun in his pocket, time to back away and maybe call for assistance after it's obvious that he's not going to pull his hand out of his pocket - that or fire the taser immediately. Coming that close, if the guy does pull a gun and start shooting, you're in deep trouble - farther away, the guy is much more likely to miss.
     
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  11. gino831

    gino831 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Reno
    Name:
    Gene
    Minutes hang like hours when important things are happening.
     
  12. code3ryder

    code3ryder Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San Jose
    Name:
    Shawn
    The problem is that these systems are very expensive. It's not just the cameras, you have to have the fully system to back up all the data and manage it for evidence years down the road. Many small towns are having a hard time keeping cops on the streets much less spending tons of money on body/car cams.
     
    gino831 likes this.
  13. Classick

    Classick Off Topic King

    Location:
    Redwood City
    Name:
    Dave
    Seems like the first thing every offer should do is buy their own the Department's can reimburse them for that money and Skip all that red tape bull****
     
  14. code3ryder

    code3ryder Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San Jose
    Name:
    Shawn
    J
    Not that simple. You have to take into account chain of custody. Imagine if a video went "missing" because there is no official system for managing the video evidence. Things like this need to be uniform across a department.
     
  15. Classick

    Classick Off Topic King

    Location:
    Redwood City
    Name:
    Dave
    I appreciate that greatly, I do.. but if all it does is gives even unofficial accountability... Seems like a no brainer.

    Hell upload that **** to Dropbox in the "just in case"folder
     
  16. gino831

    gino831 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Reno
    Name:
    Gene

    While Dropbox may work great for your personal data, maybe your business data as well, the world of the criminal justice system is different. It is not just the technical issues, but also the legal issues. The courts have to have evidence policy and procedures that provide clear chain of custody, as well as security, that proves that no third party could possibly have changed the evidence. Having a clear, court accepted policy, regarding storage, destruction, distribution, duplication, etc. is a really big deal, because if you don't the defense will have your images tossed out of court. As you can imagine, having your images not shown to the jury can make prosecution more challenging.

    You have no idea how many years we continued to use film cameras for evidence gathering, while waiting for digital data chain of custody issues to be sorted out by the court systems. Some of that stuff moves slower than glaciers, before global warming got underway.
     
    John likes this.
  17. sonnyt650

    sonnyt650 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Mountain View
    Name:
    Sonny
    I have to believe it's like firearms in general: better to use them when necessary and worry about the legal headache later. With that in mind if it was me I'd probably buy my own personal camera if one wasn't already available, just to protect myself from accusations rather than to provide evidence of crimes.
     
    Classick and Ankur like this.
  18. afmoto

    afmoto working on quality laps around the sun

    Location:
    W. San Jose
    Name:
    Alex
    Besides the body cam thing, another issue I see is that officers are becoming more reluctant to draw their gun and instead pull their taser. Until it can be established that a suspect doesn't have any weapons, I personally feel that every officer should pull his gun and be ready to defend himself or herself with deadly force. Would the dirtbag in this video pull his gun and shoot the officer if the officer had his gun pointed at him? I think that's less likely. Besides, the taser would've had more difficulty getting through such a bulky jacket and I'm not so sure it could get proper penetration, so the officer might as well have pulled a slingshot.
     
    code3ryder likes this.
  19. Classick

    Classick Off Topic King

    Location:
    Redwood City
    Name:
    Dave
    Don't you think having body cameras and instant proof that there was a weapon or an imminent danger to the officers lives that would help officers feel more secure in drawing their weapon in those instances where they thought it was necessary?

    I should think the Departments and officers would welcome that safety net.... But instead as in the case of the Baltimore officers it seems as though they're more fearful of getting caught doing something corrupt or abusing the rights of civilians
     
  20. Andrew

    Andrew ... and Mexico will pay for it.

    Location:
    San Jose
    Name:
    Andrew
    You can buy a lot of body cameras and cloud storage for the price of a militarized humvee.

    Totally affordable with correct prioritization and the reduction in lawsuits will help too.
     
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